Deep Thoughts On A Saturday

I recently was interviewed by a woman from Muse for Oakley Women. She had asked me a very interesting question that got me thinking…

How would you FEEL if you couldn’t workout AT ALL for a month?

Wow…

In all 28 years of my life, I hadn’t ever thought about it, and to be honest, I’ve been very fortunate and have for the most part been injury free for all 28 years. A few sprained ankles, or pulled hamstring muscles here and there, but nothing where I couldn’t do, ANYTHING. She had qualified it to me being in a hospital for the entire month, or bed ridden.

My immediate reaction was that, I would feel trapped, claustrophobic, and HELPLESS. So, what did working out really mean to me then? I, sometimes, am out for a long run, or long ride, and I think…WHY am I doing this? There’s a sense of accomplishment, and I like to look good, and it makes me feel good, but really WHY? And when I looked at it the other way, and thought about not being able to workout, it got me really thinking what working out, or what triathlon really means to me. It means FREEDOM. It means INDEPENDENCE. It means ADVENTURE, strength, passion, sense of accomplishment, pride. But the most important thing I realized is that truly the ability to workout provides me freedom and independence. I thought, how crazy is that? I had an epiphany, and found out WHY, I do triathlon, it isn’t just the challenge, or the competition, or the fun of it, but it provides me the ability to express my sense of freedom and independence.

Pretty cool.

How would YOU feel if you couldn’t workout for a month or longer?

  • http://triingforpro.wordpress.com ktfit

    Thanks Kurt! It’s kinda fun to think about these things, ya know?

  • http://triingforpro.wordpress.com ktfit

    Totally! Being injured is tough, but it makes us all appreciate when we are free to move as we please :)

  • http://run303.wordpress.com Lucas

    I had to stop for a while a few years back. After my sophomore year of college, I had horrible tendinitis in both achilles and my left knee. So bad that I had to quit running. I didn’t run for over a year. After 6 months or so though, I was finally able to start doing some small stuff and eventually soccer and then full on running again. It was miserable. But, my body and mind needed that break. Nothing I ever do will be as hard as that was and it makes for a great topic to mull over in the middle of a race!

  • http://wojo-becominganironman.blogspot.com Kurt

    Wow. That is a tough question, but a very important insight into the whole journey. I would like to think that I’d be able to switch over to doing something more mentally challenging while physically unable to challenge myself, but a part of me knows that wouldn’t go as well as I’d like it to. I’d feel helpless and restricted.

    I’ve spent time now and again thinking about why I do triathlon. Why do I continually challenge myself with greater distance instead of sticking to the shroter, “easy stuff”? For me, it comes down a few things. Challenge. I want to know where my limit is; what am I capable of doing? Sense of accomplishment. My Ironman was two years in the making that no one can ever take away from me. Interdependence. I’ve always disliked relying on others and triathlon and long-distance endurance events in general allow me to extend the reach of how far I can go on my own. Health. I’ve unconsciously changed my perspective on food, fashion, relationships, work, and life in total because of this crazy obsession with swimming, biking, and running. And I like the changes that have occurred so far.

    LOVE this post!!